Steinbeck’s observations on men and women

The beginning of ‘Grapes of Wrath’ includes the following paragraph, very interesting from the red-pill/dark enlightenment perspective. This paragraph follows a description of a severe drought ruining crops.

“Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men—to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained. The children stood near by, drawing figures in the dust with bare toes, and the children sent exploring senses out to see whether men and women would break. The children peeked at the faces of the men and women, and then drew careful lines in the dust with their toes. Horses came to the watering troughs and nuzzled the water to clear the surface dust. After a while the faces of the watching men lost their bemused perplexity and became hard and angry and resistant. Then the women knew that they were safe and that there was no break. Then they asked, What’ll we do? And the men replied, I don’t know. But it was all right. The women knew it was all right, and the watching children knew it was all right. Women and children knew deep in themselves that no misfortune was too great to bear if their men were whole.” [emphasis mine]

John Steinbeck describes several patterns in the society of his time (this was written in 1939). 1. Women and children relay on men, 2. Women are testing men to see if they are strong or weak, 3. Women feel safe near ‘angry and resistant’ men and 4. The relation between men and women is similar to the relation between women and children. This is just another example that the red-pill is not in any way new. We are just rediscovering what was meant to be forgotten. Fortunately, while the modern PC-machine can control new publications, they cannot change old books. (It is reasonable that such books will be, at least, ignored in the future, if not banned.)

Such a ‘sexist’ paragraph could have not been published today and I wonder what the ‘modern’ Steinbeck would write. I suppose that the modern version of Steinbeck would replace the first sentence by

“Heroic single moms stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, and waited to get new child-support corn and alimony corn with government corn supplements.

(Since most modern food is just processed corn, this is actually pretty accurate). The last sentence would be modified to

Women and children knew deep in themselves that no misfortune was too great to bear if the government is whole and can put baby-daddies in prison if they don’t pay up corn.

The middle would just be deleted.

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4 Responses to Steinbeck’s observations on men and women

  1. Bravo. You artfully said much with little.

  2. kfg says:

    ” . . .the red-pill is not in any way new. We are just rediscovering what was meant to be forgotten.”

    It never died. Some of those men and many of those children are still alive. The children’s children exist in the millions. Your rediscovery is the child like discovery of what is already known, delayed until later in life because you have been socially seperated from the older generations, as the old bastards just won’t die down the memory hole fast enough.

    Young men, break the chain and start living in the world instead of your “cohort” as you were trained and consider the idea that the old, masculinist idea of respecting your elders wasn’t simply an admonition to shut up and do as you are told, but that it had a far deeper meaning.

  3. Arc says:

    In Steinback’s East of Eden we see one idealistic brother take in a former whore while the other brother protests and says he doesn’t trust her. She marries the idealistic brother but drugs him one night with sleeping medications and fvcks the other brother.

    In the next generation we again have the idealistic brother whose mother (the same woman was above) is now the manager of a whore house but he doesn’t know. The other brother to hurt his naive brother shows him this, then his naive brother can’t handle it and enlists in war (which kills him) and the remaining brother picks up his idealistic brother’s girlfriend who says she loves him precisely because he is bad/flawed.

  4. evilwhitemalempire says:

    We are just rediscovering what was meant to be forgotten.
    ——————————–
    This line is golden.

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